Stop Towers in East Bolton

A year ago, Bell published an official notice in the Reflet du Lac and the Brome County News/Sherbrooke Record, stating that they are planning to install two towers in East Bolton:

One tower in the historic Bolton Pass (tower project code: F1143-Bolton Pass)
76m Wireless Self-Supporting Tower, 1016 Bolton Pass, East Bolton (Route 243)
Latitude: 45.161246 North / Longitude: -72.390167 West

This is in a green zone.  The Town Council adopted a resolution allowing Bell to build this tower when the necessary zoning change had been done.  Bell ignored this and began construction.  Over 100 trees were clear-cut, an access road built and the foundations have been poured.  The Town rescinded its resolution.  The CPTAQ (agricultural commission) has threatened to sue Bell.  And the Minister of Industry Canada, Geoffrey Moore has ordered Bell to stop construction until further notice.

We are awaiting the final decision which is the Minister’s to make.

Rumour has it that Bell is now looking at a plan B – to put the tower a few hundred meters over the Municipal line in Potton on Baker Talc Road.

Another tower  on chemin Mountain (tower project code: F1145)
This one was abandoned because of strong citizen opposition and mainly because the Town Council did not support it.  Bell now wants to put this tower up a few hundred meters over the municipal line in Potton on Sugar Loaf Pond Road. 

This tower will destroy the landscape near the Abbey St-Benoit du Lac, and radiate microwaves on residents in three municipalities (East Bolton, Potton and Austin).

Please click here to help us fight this tower.  We have until February 27th to submit our petition and letters.

 

We need to mobilize immediately because Industry Canada only allows 30 days for us to question the need for these towers!   We only have until Feb 27

Demand a stop to the installation of towers in East Bolton and Potton stating that they are unnecessary and unwanted

Let’s make sure that decisions are not made based on economic desires of private interests such as Bell but rather on a public planning process that evaluates the actual communications needs and how they can best be met.

These decisions should benefit us and not just Bell!